Meghan Slocum

Primal Sausage, Kale, and Potato Soup

This recipe was contributed courtesy of Meghan Slocum of Whole Natural Life.

This recipe originated as a vegetarian kale and potato soup from the cookbook Laurel’s Kitchen.

When Jesse and I first started making it together (sometime in 2007ish, I would guess), we soon modified it to include a hearty helping of breakfast sausage. When I make soup, I want it to be filling enough to make up the entire meal, which this recipe certainly accomplishes when you include the sausage. More recently, I also started substituting chicken broth for the water or vegetable stock called for in the original recipe–a modification that makes this soup both more flavorful and more nutritious.

If you don’t think that you particularly like kale, I’d still urge you to give this recipe to try. I’m generally not a big fan of kale, but I absolutely love it in this soup. Steaming it separately mitigates that really strong kale flavor, and something about immersing it in broth makes the texture much appealing than I’ve ever found any kale side dish.

 

Primal Sausage, Kale, and Potato Soup
A hearty, Primal soup made of real food ingredients.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 large onion, diced
  2. Unrefined coconut oil or your favorite cooking oil
  3. 1 lb. pork breakfast sausage, ground (spice your own if you can't find any pre-spiced)
  4. 3 large organic potatoes, diced
  5. 1 bunch organic kale, ribs removed and chopped into bite-sized pieces
  6. 3 cloves garlic, minced
  7. 5 cups organic, pastured chicken broth, or more to thin soup
  8. Pinch nutmeg, or more to taste
  9. Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Saute onions in coconut oil (or your other cooking oil of choice) in a Dutch oven or soup pot.
  2. When onions begin to turn translucent, add pork breakfast sausage. Cook breakfast sausage, breaking up meat into small clumps as it's cooking, until cooked through.
  3. Add minced garlic and cook for a couple minutes, until the garlic is just barely beginning to brown.
  4. Add broth and the diced potatoes. Bring soup to a boil and then reduce heat to a simmer. Simmer until potatoes are soft.
  5. While the potatoes are cooking, steam your chopped kale in a separate pot. (While you can let the kale cook directly in the soup, steaming the kale separately ensures that the kale flavor doesn't overpower the other ingredients.)
  6. After the potatoes are fully cooked, gently mash about half of them with a fork or similar tool to thicken the soup. Add kale to your soup pot. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper. If your soup no longer seems brothy enough (we like it thick, but still definitely liquid), add water or additional broth until you reach your desired consistency. Serve and enjoy!
PrimalKidz https://primalkidz.com/

whole natural life

Meghan and her family have been eating traditional, real foods since 2010, which, combined with some time on the GAPS diet, has brought them significant health improvements. They love raw milk, grass-fed/pastured meats, tons of healthy fats like butter and coconut oil, and plenty of local fruits and vegetables. The Slocum’s have also been endeavoring to live a more natural life by eliminating disposable products and removing toxins from their home. Meghan honestly doesn’t strive to be perfect–as there are some modern conveniences that she’s just not willing to give up, but she has made a lot of strides in minimizing their use of commercial products that hurt them and the planet, and hopes to inspire you to do the same! You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram

Paleo Roasted Fall Cinnamon Sweet Potatoes

 

This recipe was provided courtesy of Meghan Slocum, of Whole Natural Life.

These cinnamon sweet potatoes are a nice change from typical vegetable side dishes, and are perfect for fall inspired meals. Our daughter, Keira LOVES these, probably because the cinnamon really brings out the sweet potatoes’ natural sweetness. I love that they’re quick to pull together and make great leftovers the next day.

If you decide to start making this recipe regularly, I highly recommend buying your cinnamon by the pound, rather than in the little spice jars. You save a lot of money by buying spices in bulk, and it’s definitely worth it if you go through a lot of cinnamon like we do.

 

Cinnamon Sweet Potatoes
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Ingredients
  1. Two very large sweet potatoes
  2. 3 tablespoons organic, unrefined coconut oil
  3. 4 teaspoons ceylon cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Wash and peel sweet potatoes, then dice into cubes approximately 1.5 inches square. You want them all to be roughly the same size, but don't worry if you have a lot of variation.
  3. Transfer sweet potatoes into a 15" by 10" rectangular baking dish. Add coconut oil and cinnamon and toss to combine. (If your coconut oil is solid, you can put your baking dish in the oven for a few minutes to melt the oil before mixing it in.) Your sweet potatoes should be lightly coated with oil; if they seem too dry, feel free to add extra oil.
  4. Bake at 400 degrees for 50-60 minutes, or until the sweet potatoes are soft when pierced with a fork.
PrimalKidz https://primalkidz.com/

whole natural life blogMeghan and her family have been eating traditional, real foods since 2010, which, combined with some time on the GAPS diet, has brought them significant health improvements. They love raw milk, grass-fed/pastured meats, tons of healthy fats like butter and coconut oil, and plenty of local fruits and vegetables. The Slocum’s have also been endeavoring to live a more natural life by eliminating disposable products and removing toxins from their home. Meghan honestly doesn’t strive to be perfect–as there are some modern conveniences that she’s just not willing to give up, but she has made a lot of strides in minimizing their use of commercial products that hurt them and the planet, and hopes to inspire you to do the same! You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Marinated Sweet Beets – A Primal Holiday Side Dish

This recipe has been provided courtesy of Meghan Slocum, of Whole Natural Life

Normally our family mostly enjoy beets roasted with carrots and onions, but lately I’ve also been loving them in this simple marinated side dish. I especially like this recipe because it makes a bunch of leftovers that keep well in the fridge and taste good eaten cold. We prepare virtually all of our own meals, but ideally I only like to cook for dinner so leftovers are a huge asset in our house.

My toddler is also a big fan of this recipe. The prunes make this dish taste fairly sweet, which I assume is what she enjoys about it. She doesn’t particularly care for beets on their own, so if I can entice her to eat beets by adding some fruit to them, I’m all for that.

If you have time, this dish tastes best when made at least a few hours in advance. Advance preparation gives time for the marinade to be absorbed by the beets and prunes.

Marinated Sweet and Tangy Beets
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Ingredients
  1. 3 large beets
  2. 8 prunes
  3. 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar, or to taste
  4. Salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Trim stems and ends from beets and scrub well. Place in a lidded baking dish and roast until beets are soft. I find that large beets take about 1.5 hours or so, but I'd start checking them after an hour.
  3. Once beets are done, allow them to cool until you can handle them comfortably, then remove the skins. Chop beets into bite-sized pieces.
  4. Chop prunes, then add to beets. Add apple cider vinegar and salt to taste. Mix all to combine.
  5. Chill in the fridge until you are ready to serve.
PrimalKidz https://primalkidz.com/

whole natural life blogMeghan and her family have been eating traditional, real foods since 2010, which, combined with some time on the GAPS diet, has brought them significant health improvements. They love raw milk, grass-fed/pastured meats, tons of healthy fats like butter and coconut oil, and plenty of local fruits and vegetables. The Slocum’s have also been endeavoring to live a more natural life by eliminating disposable products and removing toxins from their home. Meghan honestly doesn’t strive to be perfect–as there are some modern conveniences that she’s just not willing to give up, but she has made a lot of strides in minimizing their use of commercial products that hurt them and the planet, and hopes to inspire you to do the same! You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram.