Chinese food is most often synonymous with New Years Eve. It is undoubtedly one of the busiest nights of the year for Chinese food restaurants, and if you’re following a Paleo diet or you are trying to eat healthfully this holiday season, springing for Chinese takeout may not be the best option. There is good news though! Tons of Paleo bloggers have created delicious, Paleo friendly versions of Chinese food that you can whip up in a jiffy on New Years Eve so you’re not feeling so left out while your friends and family are chowing down on fried rice. 

We’ve compiled several of the yummiest looking Paleo Chinese food recipes on the web, and created a sample menu you can use for New Years planning. No Googling and scouring for recipes that look appetizing, and trying to figure out what you will serve with what, because we’ve done it all for you!

 

1.)  Paleo Sweet & Sour Chicken – The Domestic Man

paleo sweet and sour chicken

Sweet and sour chicken is technically more of an American interpretation of Chinese food than an actual Chinese dish; it is nonetheless regarded as a Chinese dish in America and is also an extremely popular one at that. We chose The Domestic Man’s recipe because photos don’t lie, and that sweet and sour sauce looks sweet, sour, gooey, and sticky! (Which, we all know, is the best kind of sauce!) While he doesn’t add any veggies to his sweet and sour chicken, we encrouage you to load your plate with colorful veggies like red peppers and snap peas to compliment the sweet and sourness of the chicken. Head on over to The Domestic Man to grab his mouthwatering recipe!

 

2.) Paleo Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry – Wholesomelicious

paleo ginger beef and broccoli stir fry

It goes without saying that you can’t eat some New Years Chinese food and not have beef and broccoli. Beef and broccoli go together like..peanut butter and jelly. This easy recipe for Ginger Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry by Wholesomelicious takes only twenty minutes to prepare before you’re on your way to enjoying some serious deliciousness!

 

3.) Paleo Veggie Lo Mein Noodles – Raising Generation Nourished

paleo veggie lo mein noodles

Lo Mein noodles are one of those Chinese classics you just can’t forget on New Years. Noodles however, are definitely NOT Paleo! No worries though, because spiraled veggies serve as a fabulous substitute for noodles in this recipe for Paleo Veggie Lo Mein Noodles by Raising Generation Nourished. This recipe can also be thrown together in as little as 15 minutes, without sacrificing on taste. For a true Paleo Chinese food experience, visit Raising Generation Nourished to get the deets on this delectable recipe!

 

4.) Slow Cooker Chinese Spare Ribs – Slim Palate

paleo slow cooker chinese spare ribs

Chinese spare ribs are another classic, favorite dish among chinese food aficionados, but traditionally made Chinese spare ribs are usually doused with GMO soy sauce and a whole host of other non-Paleo friendly ingredients that are also loaded with MSG. This recipe for Paleo Chinese Slow Cooker Spare Ribs by Slim Palate is 100% Paleo compliant though, and uses a combination of Chinese 5 Spice, coconut amines, apple cider vinegar, dry white wine, honey and tomato paste to create that classic Chinese spare ribs flavor. The ribs are also browned first and then placed in the slow cooker all day to create a succulent and juicy meat that falls off the bone. This is a great recipe to start in the morning and let cook all day while you prepare the other dishes in this menu! The recipe would also work well served over cauli-rice like pictured, or served alongside the Paleo Fried Rice recipe below.

 

5.) Paleo Fried Rice – Jay’s Baking Me Crazy

paleo cauliflower fried rice - paleo cauli rice

This wouldn’t be a Chinese food roundup without a fried rice recipe included! This recipe for Paleo Cauliflower Fried Rice by Jay’s Baking Me Crazy won’t leave any room for disappointment either! It is a very simple, quick recipe you can whip up and then cover and set aside while you prepare the more involved main course. The taste and texture of this fried cauli-rice recipe is incredibly similar to traditional fried rice, but is chock full of healthy ingredients instead like cauliflower (duh), carrots, onions, and green onions. This recipe also tends to go heavier on the ginger, but feel free to adjust seasonings to your personal liking! Head on over to Jay’s Baking Me Crazy for this awesome recipe!

 

8.) Paleo Wontons – Life Made Full

paleo wontons

If you’ve stayed with us so far, you will surely not be disappointed! You probably didn’t think Wontons were ever going to be an option while eating Paleo, did you? Wrong. They totally are on your New Years menu this year! This recipe for Paleo Wontons by Life Made Full is nothing short of a miracle. The crispy dough is replicated by using tapioca flour, almond flour, egg whites, and coconut milk, which is then fried in palm shortening. While this image does depict the wontons filled with cream cheese (which is #NOTPaleo), you are free to fill your wontons with whatever you like! (If you want a Paleo-friendly version of cream cheese, we recommend using cashew cream cheese instead.) Head on over to Life Made Full for this mouthwatering recipe!

 

9.) Paleo Chinese Almond Cookies – Texanerin Baking

paleo chinese almond cookies

After all this Paleo friendly Chinese-inspired fried food, we had to culminate this roundup with a dessert recipe of course! These Paleo Chinese Almond Cookies by Texanerin Baking may not be 100% “Chinese,” but they are pretty darn close when it comes to Paleo baking. These cookies are chewy, delicious, and satisfying! Even if you are a cookie monster, you won’t feel guilty indulging in these cookies because they are full of healthy, filling ingredients like almond flour, coconut flour, coconut oil and maple syrup. 

 

10.) Paleo Coconut Mango Pudding – Eat, Heal, Thrive

paleo coconut mango pudding

Mango pudding is a traditional Chinese dessert that will be sure to please everyone. This recipe for Paleo Coconut Mango Pudding by Eat, Heal, Thrive is a close and healthy representation of the dessert traditionally enjoyed in China. This recipe also happens to be AIP (Autoimmune Paleo) friendly as well! It is an extremely simple recipe made with only a few ingredients: gelatin, coconut milk, mango chunks and water (a little bit of honey is optional too!) so you really don’t have to worry about indulging in too much sugar at the end of your meal. Head over to Eat, Heal, Thrive to get the full recipe!

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